Knowledge Base

At Castellan Systems we have collected a lot of information about Project Management. This includes tips, hints, techniques and tools. In this page we present it for other Project Management professionals to browse and use if appropriate.

As Project Managers ourselves, we know that you never stop learning and someone out there may actually have a better way of doing things than our way. The trick is to be open to these ideas. Having also come from an IT development background, we also have the tendancy to develop our own tools and templates every time we need to do something new; we guess we're still a frustrated code-cutters at heart. But we're not always the first to think of these things, so we have taught ourselves to embrace the knowledge out there.

Project Phases

Project Management Knowledge Base

At Castellan Systems we have collected a lot of information about Project Management. This includes tips, hints, techniques and tools. In this page we present it for other Project Management professionals to browse and use if appropriate.

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Waterfall Model Guide

Updated

The term "Waterfall" refers to a traditional software development methodology where the project is defined sequentially and through clear project phases. This is a common approach to large-scale projects where little change is expected to the overall project plan. This is a distinct approach from Agile project planning, which is designed to accommodate rapid changes to the schedule.

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Agile Model Guide

Agile is sweeping the world. Well, it is if you’re involved in product development. It’s not new, Agile has been around for over 20 years, but it’s seems to have gained traction with each passing year and is trending, as they say in social media circles. But is Agile really the miracle cure for all project woes as it’s often prescribed?

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Hybrid Model Guide

The term hybrid methodology isn’t as opaque as some new ideas that have sprouted up recently in the field of product development. The simple definition is that it’s a combination of two different methodologies or systems to create a new and better model.

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When to Choose Waterfall over Agile Guide

New

Prior to the extremely popular Agile methodology, there was Waterfall. Waterfall is defined as a sequential or linear product development methodology in which each development phase is completed before the next one begins. Waterfall is a straightforward, logical approach to product development. In this method, you determine what to build, plan the build, work out a schedule, obtain your resources, assign resources, develop the product, hand it off to a test team, work out the bugs, and then release it. Along the way the marketing team creates some “buzz” in anticipation of the product, and sales people convince customers that the new product will solve all of their problems. Since the introduction of Agile, Waterfall isn’t used as often, but there are still there are plenty of times when it makes sense to use Waterfall.

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Barbarians at the Gate - In defense of Project Managers

The proponents of Agile talk about it being an alternative to traditional “Waterfall Project Management”; this a fallacy. Waterfall is not Project Management; it’s a Product Development approach, technique or methodology but it’s not Project Management. So, if Agile is an alternative to Waterfall, then Agile is not Project Management either and its use should not lead to the exclusion of proper Project Management processes.

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Scrum Framework Guide

Scrum is a framework for developing, delivering, and sustaining complex products. This Guide contains the definition of Scrum. This definition consists of Scrum’s roles, events, artifacts, and the rules that bind them together.

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Scrum Master Guide

There are not two other words that when put together sound as unseemly as… Scrum Master. If you’re new to Agile, you might wonder who in their right mind would want that title? Agile devotees, however, have a reverence for the role; only those worthy to walk in the footsteps of Jedi Knights ahead of them… or something.

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Kanban Method Guide

New

Kanban is getting a lot of buzz these days as a project management method because, according to its fans, it can overcome problems that stymie methodologies like Scrum and Waterfall. But with its Japanese origins and Zen-like aura, Kanban is mysterious to many people. One of the most quoted sayings in Kanban is: “Stop starting and start finishing.” Sounds profound, but how do you implement that?

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Lean Method Guide

New

Lean is an often-used adjective in business these days, but there’s some confusion over its exact definition. In essence, the goal of Lean is to maximize value while minimizing waste. In other words, creating more value for the customer with fewer resources. Lean was born on the factory floor, so many people think of it as a manufacturing technique. However, that’s a misconception because every process, whether in production or services, can benefit from a Lean approach. Today, Lean is finding a home in every industry from finance to healthcare.

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Product Based Planning Guide

There are many different ways of creating a plan. One of them is a product-based planning technique. With Product Based Planning, your focus is first and foremost on the products that need to be delivered as opposed to the activities the project needs to undertake. It means that you plan the project from the client’s and user’s perspective, because you put the focus on tangible deliverables and outcomes.

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Product Based Planning with Microsoft Project Guide

You may have limited project management technology available to you, but you’re determined to make every aspect of your project as data-driven as possible. You can use Microsoft Project as the primary database for your project and you can now do the same for your project’s product-based planning data.

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Earned Value Management Guide

Earned Value Management (EVM) is a project management technique that objectively tracks physical accomplishment of work. cost overruns. EVM has emerged as a financial analysis specialty in United States Government programs in the 1960s, but it has since become a significant branch of project management.

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Programme Management Guide

The ultimate goal of a Programme is to realise outcomes and benefits of strategic relevance. To achieve this a programme is designed as a temporary flexible organisation structure created to coordinate, direct and oversee the implementation of a set of related projects and activities in order to deliver outcomes and benefits related to the organisation's strategic objectives.

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Delivering Successful Programmes Guide

The rapid pace of innovation and the increasing level of management, stakeholder and customer expectations demand that organisations re-assess how they do business. Programme management, which PMI® defines as “a group of related projects managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits and control not available from managing them individually,” is key to executing major strategic initiatives. Unfortunately, many organisations are ill-equipped to manage larger-scale programmes. This paper describes 10 vital steps of programme management that must be done right in order for organisations to successfully deliver the benefits of change initiatives. The steps, which may be performed by a programme manager or by others within the organisation, together address the three overarching responsibilities of the programme manager: effective governance, stakeholder management and benefits management.

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A Guide to Project Planning in Project Management

New

Project planning is a major first step towards a successful project. A project plan is a strategic organization of ideas, materials and processes for the purpose of achieving a goal. Project managers rely on a good plan to avoid pitfalls and provide parameters to maintain crucial aspects of the project, like the schedule and the budget.

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Using DACI Framework for Better Group Decisions Guide

New

DACI is a project management framework used to clearly define the roles of the various stakeholders on a project. DACI stands for Driver, Approver, Contributor and Informed. These roles, defined by DACI, make it clear who has authority in certain areas and situations. This allows a project to progress smoothly whenever group decisions have to be made.

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